Sweet Corn

Few foods epitomize North America in the way that corn, or maize, does. Called mahiz by the indigenous peoples, meaning ‘that which sustains us,’ corn was considered one of the vital ‘three sisters’ of their food supply, the other two being winter squash and beans. Corn is the most widely grown crop in the world,…

Carrot

Carrots come in a whole spectrum of colors, including red, yellow, and purple varieties, each with its own visual and nutritional appeal. They are essential in kitchens the world over, and unlike many other root vegetables, carrots are as delicious raw as they are cooked. We may think of the carrot as a distinctively orange-…

Cabbage

Although cabbage tends to be regarded as a rather dreary, soggy excuse for a vegetable, when treated with restraint (not overcooked, that is) it can be most agreeable to eat. Seafaring explorers who ate cabbage to guard against scurvy were on to something, as modern science now tells us that it is relatively rich in…

Cauliflower

Like its close relation broccoli, the edible part of cauliflower is composed of tightly clustered florets of immature flower buds called the ‘curd,’ which is hugged by tight green leaves. The leaves serve as a shield from the sun, preventing chlorophyll development in the curd, thus keeping the cauliflower its characteristically milky-white color. Selection and…

Broccoli and Broccolini

Like others in the brassica family, broccoli began its life in the Mediterranean. The most common sort of broccoli is the familiar emerald green variety with tightly clusters tiny buds sitting atop thick stalks. A more recent addition to the scene is broccolini, a cross between broccoli and Chinese kale. Broccolini is gaining in popularity…

Cherry Tomato

Cherry Tomatoes are very sweet, miniature versions of traditional large tomatoes, but they are equally as nutritious. Cherry tomatoes are high in vitamins A, B and Lycopene (an antioxidant). A longtime farm favorite cherry tomato is Sungold. Summer is not complete until we can snack on a handful of these delicious, tiny bursts of flavor….

Tomato

Tomatoes fresh from the field are the star of summer meals! Although the tomato is associated closely with Italy, it is interesting to note that tomato sauce wasn’t paired with pasta until the mid-1700’s and the tomato didn’t become widely popular until the 1800’s. There’s been a lot of press in recent years for the…

Potato

Considering it comes from such a poisonous plant (only the tubers are edible), the potato has made an incalculable impact on the global diet, providing more protein and energy than any other food crop, per unit of land. And who doesn’t love the humble potato? We grow several varieties of fingerling potatoes. Fingerling potatoes are…

Eggplant

The only member of the deadly nightshade clan to be native to the East, the eggplant was once viewed with enormous suspicion in certain parts of Europe. Arab traders too the vegetable west, first to Spain. The Spanish warmed to it quite readily and called it the ‘apple of love’ as they believed it to…

Fennel

Although commonly referred to as a ‘bulb’ cultivated fennel is not a true bulb at all but rather has thickened leaf stems. Selection and Storage: Wrapped in a paper bag and refrigerated, fennel can last three to five days. But, as bulbs tend to dry out over time, it’s best to use them as soon…

Celery

Celery is a somewhat utilitarian, underappreciated vegetable. It is one of those greens that most cooks have in their refrigerator, ending up chopped into a soup, a sauce or a salad. Personally I was never a fan of celery until we started growing it. Now we can’t get enough of it and are continually finding…

Bell Pepper – Sweet Pepper

Bell Peppers, so named for their squat, blocky, bell share, also called Sweet Peppers, because they lack the heat producing compound common in hot peppers, all start out green and then ripen to red, yellow, or orange peppers. The color changes and their sweetness increases depending on how long they’re allowed to ripen on the…